How to ask customers for reviews

How to ask customers for reviews

January 30, 2020

There are two ways businesses can request reviews from customers. In-person or digitally. One might jump out to you as the obvious choice, but there are positives and negatives to both. Let's compare them.

Asking for a business review face to face is more personable. So, it will usually result in a higher conversion rate. However, as a busy business owner, it is likely you won't remember to ask every customer.

For this reason, you may occasionally ask customers digitally. You can catch all the customers you forgot to ask in person by periodically sending a review request message to the customers you dealt with in recent history.

The issue is that sending out a message for each customer every time you complete a transaction is still a manual process that requires time and resources to execute.

There is another option that still gets your business reviews but requires far less effort. Nowadays, business owners have the opportunity to automate the review request process. They can set up an app once and leave it to ask every customer for a review automatically.

If you are asking every customer, this begs the question, what if the feedback the customer has to give is not positive? If you are speaking with your customers in person, you have the opportunity to pick and choose who you ask. Whereas if you are relying on an automated system to ask every customer, it may be promoting the wrong type of customer to speak up.

This exact reason is why most automatic review request emails screen customers before asking for a review. They put customers through a short survey before mentioning reviews to make sure they are only stirring up positive reviews. Make sure you choose review request software that has this functionality.

Use QuickBooks Online to get more customer reviews.

Setting up an automated system to ask all customers for a review when jobs are completed means you should never miss out on asking a customer for a review. However, fewer customers may follow through with supplying the info if you ask in this way because it seems impersonal.

On the other hand, if you are asking the customer digitally, they are already on a computer when they see your request. You can provide them with a link that takes them directly to place to enter their review. They can follow the link right away and give their input while you still have their attention. If you ask in person, the customer may say yes to your face but never remember again what they promised to do.

You see now that there are more pros and cons to both methods, then you may have initially thought. So, now that you know more about both, which is best? The perfect approach is one that incorporates the best of both worlds. It goes as follows.

In-person, if you remember, tell the customer to look out for an email from your company shortly that will allow them to provide a testimonial. It is worth mentioning that the testimonials from customers like them have a considerable impact on the success of your business.

By discussing the review request before had, an email won't seem so impersonal. And if you forget to mention it, at least relying entirely on an email has a better chance of converting then nothing.

The review request will either be a reminder or your whole pitch. Regardless, the design should make leaving a testimonial trivial. So much so that the customer can't help but give their feedback.

You now have a starting point to expand on as you take action and build out your business review request process. Below are some resources to help you continue to devise and implement your companies winning strategy.

Review request software:

Review email templates:

Review request articles: